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CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 1:15pm EST
represented their quest to provide order to a part of -- on the flanks to their imperial interests in india. the southern coast of the gulf had been called in the 1800s, the pirate coast, and the constantly feuding tribes fused with one another, which spill out into the sea-born approaches to india, and result in attacks on india, and possibly resulting weakness that might bring another great power. so the british found themselves pulled into the gulf in the 1800s. not to colonize as they did further to the east in india but, rather to maintain order there, and they did, with a relatively small amount of military force. but you're right, the story in the 1800s, and the 1900s, until the early 1970s, was one of british control over the persian gulf. and it was in the aftermath of world war world car -- world war ii, the british began their slow, prolonged entrend. in the gulf. with the independence of india in the late 1940s, the british lost the rationale for the military presence in the gulf, and they lost to a degree the money to pay for the military presence that maintained order for so l
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 8:30pm EST
miller, and then we have the editorial director of india today, and a very big star blasters program, i enjoyed our encounter last year and expects similar feistiness, m.j. akbar. finally, we have paul madison, who is commander of the navy. thank you for joining us. when i was thinking about the title today and thinking about our panel, it occurred to me and i went online to find a chinese event is being held right now. there are no canadians, japanese, americans, on this panel. we don't have any chinese today, but we should have a lot of fun discussing strategy in asia pacific region with china, but i also want to acknowledge that that voice may not be with us today, but that could be giving us room to run. i went to china and visited with the ministry of foreign affairs and i met with their director and the finally said i cannot understand what the grand strategy is. this was about 2004. and i said, what is your grand strategy? and it was how to keep you guys distracted. [laughter] that seems to be shifting. one of the very interesting things, i know this is not a u.s. panel, but just
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2012 1:15am EST
interest of india. the southern coast of the gulf was called the piru coast. constantly feuding tribes would feud with one another spilling out of the seaboard approach to in the and resulted in the tax on india. so the british found themselves pooled into the gulf during the 1800's. not to colonize it to maintain order. they did with the relatively small amount of military force. but you are right. up through the early 1870's was one of british hegemonic control over the persian golf. the aftermath of rope or two with the independence of india that the british brigade at -- began their retrenchment with the independence of india, the british lost the rationale for their military presence and their lost the money to pay for their presence there. >>host: did the americans step in because of the vacuum or because they were asked? >> the story of british control shepherding over the golf plays itself out over 20 years. in 1968 the british announced the impending withdrawal in three years the americans initially said in very it explicit terms will not replace the british. the january 1968
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 2:00pm EST
thought china and india and other emerging economies might sign on to emissions reduction and therefore if we reduced emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. i don't take a position on whether man-made emissions cause global warming are not, but if we are reducing emissions in china and india, which make up 37% of the worlds population are not doing so, we're not going to have any effect on global temperatures. in the first chapter of the book i talk about geoengineering solutions that nobel prize winning scientists paul crookston thinks could reduce global temperatures if we adjust honoring such as spurring water or painting rooms white to reflect the sun rays. what we are doing with the $12 billion they spent on alternative energy is pushing people into cars they don't want to buy. we are raising electricity costs. we are getting rid of incandescent light bulbs and fluorescent lightbulbs. the cost of this falls disproportionately on to those who are least able to afford it. the lowest of the income distribution according to recent data assessment that the la
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 1:20am EST
china and burma india theater. and if the special operations started with the oss in china and world war ii. oss also established the foundation for some of the intelligence framework that pos it to china for example. they are a training of the younger experts and those peopl ter world war to become the leading authorities of the american intelligence as well as the government policy services, so those are very big contributions. they also have some other lessons and grounders as well. >> what was one of the blunders >> one of the things is that i would say oss is trying so hard to establish itself as legitimate. they're always trying to constantly. for example, its independence from the liberation intelligence. the are too reliant upon th british intelligence. now for the intelligence analysis to the intelligence service is also a flaw itself. it works both ways. that's because once you add this analysis to the service. it's very fanatical. in other words it is not just to inform, it is to predic
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 3:45pm EST
explained that she was returning to india in a few days and hope to catch a glance of the president before she went home. she then arranged for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so that she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the engagement. i used the story because i think it exemplifies several key points i wish to make about pat and her public role. particularly about the role of foreign diplomats. first, she met the woman during one of her travels as first lady. the traveling she did as first and second lady was the best part of her job. as a political wife. second, she was just a young woman who had come to the united states and had come out to see the second lady and see the united states to study. she treated everyone she met as though they were the most important person in the world. there, she was happiest in her role when she could take action. the party they were out in the engagement they were going to or not is important at that moment as getting this visitor from india a seat at the presidential dinner. in th
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 10:30am EDT
an optometrist in southern india and in the late 1970s he retired and does his retirement project, he was about 57 and he wanted to do something for his community. and so he decided he was going to try to address the problem is needless blindness due to cataracts. in the united states of the minor outpatient operation. you don't have people blind to the cataracts. and the rest of the world are super hundred million people blind due to cataracts. this is something that brought her view was known wanted to address. so he started the clinic and is held and he had a sudden basden family members helped him and he got the thing the ground. anyway, come forward not just one or two or three great ideas, but hundreds of innovations. tenacity of an entire community, an entire global of people, one of the folks who contributed to the eradication of smallpox. cannot you put your name david greene. all these people work together to build the arvind iyer of hospital. to this day, the hospital has killed her than 3 million people of blindness. now come to you imagine the entire washington matche
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 6:00pm EST
. the woman explained she was returning to india in a few days and hope to catch a glimpse of the president before she went home. have been arranged for the woman to be given a seat at the dinner so she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to the previous engagement. i use this story to begin my topic because i think it exemplifies several key points i wish to make about pat nixon public role. more particularly as foreign diplomat. patton at the indian woman during one of her travels the second lady. the traveling she did as first and second lady was the best part of her job as a political wife. second, this is not the wife of ambassador or statesmen. she was just a young woman who had come to the united states and then had come to the united states to study. pat didn't limit her contact server trouble to import people. she treated everyone she met as if they were the most important person in the world. the people she met sinister sincerity and responded to it. third, she was happiest in her will when she could take action. th
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 11:00pm EST
what she was doing in the hallway. the woman explained that she was returning to india in a few days and was hoping to catch a glance of the president before she went home. she then arrange for the woman to be given a speech after dinner so that she could hear the speech as well as see the president. nixon then left the hall to continue on to previous engagement. i use this the story to begin my top because i think several key points i wish to make about pat nixon and her public role. more particularly about her role as a foreign diploma
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 9:45pm EST
called oval challenges. so just one is a gentleman who is an optometrist in southern india and in the late 1970s he retired and ss retirement project he was about 57 and wanted to descend before his community. and so he decided he was going to try to address the problem of needless blindness due to cataracts. in the united states as an outpatient operation. you don't have people blind due to cataracts. and the rest of the world there's a hundred million people blind due to cataracts. so this is not a was no wanted to address. so we started the clinic in his home in yet another benson family members hope to make up this thing off the ground. forward not just one or two or three great ideas, but hundreds of innovations. tenacity of an entire community, global team of people, one of the folks who contributed to the eradication of smallpox. david greene. all these people built together to build the hospital and to this day, the hospital has secured 3 million people of blindness. i do imagine the entire washington metro area of about 3 million people. imagine all those people blind. now th
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2012 11:00pm EST
and india and other emerging economies would sign nine so to reduce emissions i don't take a position nine whether man-made emissions cause global warming and i it china and india to make up 37% of the population not doing so. and the first chapter the book i talk about geo engineering solutions win to think we could reduce global temperatures by just came roofs white to reflect the race. what we're doing with a 12 billion-dollar hours it is pushing people into cars they do not want to buy raising your much as a cost we are getting rid of incandescent light bulbs and disproportionately those zero least able to afford it the lowest fifth of and come distribution spend 24 percent of income on electricity natural-gas and gasoline. that's right. spending on energy and compared to an average of 7%. it it is just strange well-intentioned people who purport to represent advocates policies that will do them harm rather than a good british edition to hurricane the uproar industrial policies to promote solar and wind undesirable to create opportunities for political influence on to be decisions
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2012 6:00am EST
going to put all the money into india, it's their decision rather than the part of the more strategic decision-making process. congress would get involved if all the money went to one country. >> do you think? [laughter] >> there's certain country's bbg would like to get rid of that congress wouldn't allow and that sort of thing. but i'm guessing it really needs to be part of really part of the foreign policy apparatus. >> i want to open up to question. we have time for about 20 minutes. please keep them brief so we can get as many as possible. go ahead. >> first time i ever saw -- was 1967 in taipei at usia. it was in chinese. but now i work with two groups. one is dhi esper diplomats which serves the diplomatic community here in washington, and arranges events to show them what goes on you. also people to people international who post the foreign officers at the national defense university. was happen with this is weak, and we take these our homes and arrange events with them, then go back to the home countries and remember us. when diplomats wife went to thailand, she's japanese an
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 10:00pm EST
colonial possessions and citizenship. peoples of egypt, india, algeria and africa clearly did not fit the progressive sea of educated elite and by their definitions were close to life unworthy of life, unquote. but these transit marinate for a decade. in the meantime, american prosperity continues spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers, film, literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony at this time. american movie saudi production codes that emphasize the universal american teens a teacher to some. god, fairplay and avoided sensationalism and other taboo faces. american movies sold american exceptionalism, including puritanical moralism as one observer put it. they occasionally make fun of values to the work of equal such as keaton and charlie chaplin, but this is all done tongue-in-cheek and never was meant to undermine the system is self. by 1930, the u.s. at 18,000 movie houses and compared to francis 2400 britain's 3000. europe simply could not compete with hollywood and as long as hollywood sold american exceptionalism, europeans wanted
CSPAN
Nov 3, 2012 7:00am EDT
graduates which is more than the entire u.s. workforce. in five years india will be producing five times as many college graduates as the united states. these are the fact that drive the decisions we must make as we position penn state to succeed in the future. part of that strategic planning will require getting out and staying out in front of the information technology revolution which has been among the most significant drivers of educational change in the last 15 to 20 years. it has also been like a runaway train. one response to the higher education funding crisis has been increased appeals especially from legislators and business leaders for higher education to drastically increase online education. the hope is that more students will receive college degrees after at less cost and research shows that done appropriately application of technologies can both improve learning outcomes and decrease costs of delivering that education but so far savings have proven imus sieve. nonetheless, massive open online courses are testing the market. dozens of universities including mit, harvard, p
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2012 9:30am EST
policies about colonial possessions and citizenship. peoples of egypt, india, algeria and africa clearly did not forget the progressives' view of educated elites and by their definitions were close to, quote, unworthy of life, unquote. but these trends would marinate for a decade. in the meantime, american prosperity continued spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers, film, even literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony at this time, american movies followed a production code that emphasized universal american themes of patriotism. god, fair play, and they avoided sensationalism, sexual situations and other taboo vices. american movies sold american sensualism including, quote, puritanical mormonism, as one put it. they occasionally made fun of those values through the work of buster keaton and charlie chaplin, but this was never meant to totally undermine the system itself. by 1930 the u.s. had 18,000 movie houses and compared to france's 2400 and britain's 3,000. europe simply could not compete with hollywood, and as long as hollywood sold
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2012 8:00pm EST
issues that have to do with pakistan's relationship to india the issues that have to do with the sequence of events that will take place after 2014 when the american focus once again as steve mentioned, when the american focus become somewhat less on our relationship to counterterrorism and opens the door for more creative ways of business, academic, media and other links with pakistan that has suffered in last 10 years because of our focus. i guess i come out out of your question answering that i'm cautiously optimistic that there were two things on the rails which if you know what happened over the last two years is not an easy thing. it was kind of like rolling down the side of the -- with rocks and cactus is is an you don't know how far the ripping go so when i see these keeping things on track it's not easy to keep things on track and pakistan is the way it is mismanaged and the difficulties in our relationship but if we are able to do so after 2014 there will be a prospect that we can open up to new kinds of cooperation if we are not slaves to a bilateral vision based on th
CSPAN
Nov 12, 2012 8:30pm EST
, for example and regional organizations india has also been cooperating with the troika appears to latin america is very much pursuing its own pacific agenda in many cases. i'll conclude by saying that as michael mentioned, shortly following the u.s. election, china began its 18th party congress in a process of selecting its new leadership, which will be announced just this week. it seems evident or at least the opinion of scholars in the united states and china -- china's leadership transition is unlikely to have much of an effect on china's official foreign policy towards what america is pretty much on autopilot at the moment in based essentially on china's 2008 white paper on latin america and the caribbean and will continue to be based on that document. but this transition could affect other factors that influence china latin america relations. for example, proposed economic transformation china will be attempting to undertake in the next few years. state-owned enterprise operations, urbanization and industrialization plan and so on. said china's domestic developments obvious c
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 8:15am EST
, on this one he was completely and utterly wrong. because, in fact, the future of india is not made in villages which too often remain mired in the poverty that has plagued most of humanity throughout almost all of its existence. it is the cities, it is bangalore, mumbai, it is delhi that are the places that are the pathways out of poverty into prosperity. they are the places that are the conduits, the channels across civilizations and continents and the place where india's transforming itself from a place that was practically a synonym for poverty and deprivation to a place that is bubbling with opportunity. now, in some success -- in some sense, it's something of a paradox. distance is dead, every single one of us could just telecommute in to whatever, you know, whatever business employs us. occupying in whatever spot appeals to our biofill ya, and yet in so many cases we choose urban life. we choose the inconveniences, the high cost of living in urban areas despite the fact that all this new technology would make cities obsolete, it was predicted, and yet bag google wt do they do
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 11:00pm EDT
engagement strategy. it australia, new zealand as chris indicated and a rising india. >> can i jump in here. >> you mention the architect forty years ago. work with -- [inaudible] put me in the group because i grow with exactly with the approach you just outlined. and it's rebounding to asia the administration done i think very successfully there were three myths and it relates to what you were talking about. one knit started in 2011, another myth it's essentially military and all of those against china. [inaudible] i'm sure kurt would agree. the reasons he just mentioned. it started in twiep and was because asia important generally not just china india and korea and japan and southeast asia whatever you want to talk about and the economy. and it is designed to welcome china and the pacific to contain china. they are difficult to deal with. lets place this relationship briefly in historical perspective. we had four or five decades since i was first on the secret trip. as you know ahead of -- when we went in. and we a certainly a con sect yule relationship with china. we didn't have dip
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2012 9:30am EST
people in china and india into the middle class and one american drops out of the middle class, that is not such a bad trade, 4-1. i spoke to a cfo of a u.s. technology company and this is a person with a charming and lovely life story, his parents were immigrants and he told me his parents told him and his brother when they immigrated that they were temporarily for. imagine that, temporarily poor and sure enough complete rock stars, both of them went to new york. and the mass club, one brother in silicon valley and another is derivative on wall street. the technology cfo, his parents were really angry at him because he dropped out of a ph.d. program in applied math at stanford having gone to harvard to start becoming plutocrats. very hard-working guy, did smart, did great, this is what he said about the american middle-class. we are demand higher paycheck than the rest of the world. if you are going to demand ten times the paycheck you need to deliver ten times the value. it sounds harsh but maybe people of the middle-class need to decide to take a pay cut. similarly, less forgivabl
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 8:00pm EST
is getting this visitor from india a seat at the. in the greater scheme of things, it's really a small act, but it left a lasting impression on indian woman involved in women at the table that she was eventually seated at. the how we actually know about the event when she ended up sitting with responded and wrote later about it. politics is their job and when she didn't always enjoy. one occasion she was proud of her work in helping to a sense for the party, she found many frustrating and mindnumbing. by the end of the first term she expressed her jealousy of her friends reentry into the workforce. she will come out with a to do part-time work rather than all the useless gapping and expected to do. meeting famous men and women and claim our dinners at the white house not only 13 of constant away from chatter with him and she didn't always like. for someone who had worked her entire life and she had worked hard her entire list from the situation good times be intolerable. it was not the physical charges await her down. she resented not been useful, not to us a meaningful. perhaps
CSPAN
Nov 4, 2012 4:45pm EST
, new zealand. we are seeing in the emerging markets in brazil and india, evidence of overuse. this is a global phenomenon that we will have to tackle. provinces in canada 41 and 42 percent in some provinces of the state budget is health care. if you're doing that in a spending money on education, infrastructure, investment in society, technology. it's an enormous issue pretty tacky for your question. >> hi. >> hi. i'm debbie goldstein. i am a gastroenterologist, but i have spent a lot of time in primary care as well. i could spend an hour counterpointing and raising. there are so many issues. it is infinite. i wanted to make a couple of points. that is, the first thing is the whole issue of primary care. the primary care physician is being asked to be the foundation the primary care physician has the most responsibility of any other position. they have to know everything. they have to know what the right and left hand is doing. they have to coordinate. there responsible for everything that they refer people to. they have the least amount of time. there the ones that have to talk to
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2012 3:00pm EST
india. same is the same is true and brazil. this country deals with gaps between the rich and poor, agriculture, and earthen industrialize an evolving in much the same way that we're going to have to on the global stage for a the problem has been solved and can be solved. >> host: good afternoon, we have a caller from new york city. >> caller: hello, i'm so happy you're taking my call. my question is this fiscal cliff that we are approaching. if president obama allows it to happen, what kind of catastrophe are you talking about? i'm kind of concerned? so negatively will this affect the industry? how bad will it really be out there on wall street and main street? >> guest: well, let's say there are a bunch of people where the congress is involved, democrats and republicans have a role to play in whether we resolve this or not. the fact that we litigate to this extent, we are leaving the american people what the risks exposed with the fiscal squibb on time, it wants be outraged that it's generated. the fiscal cliff is a problem. you go over the cliff and the consequences can be beaut
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 11:00pm EST
after all, it's less expensive to live in places like india where the stars in the movie end up gone. i am here today to talk about an alternative to either euthanasia or outsourcing, what soon will be a quarter of the population, and argue that the solution to much ails us as individuals in a society lays in rethinking the map of life, the map of life that was in many ways set up in three score .. ople will be living in the 21st century. half the kids born since 2000 the developed world are projected to see their 100th birthday so we can't just fold, spindle, made late stretch and extend this life course that really was set up for a very different arc of life to one that is really, has an extra decibel point, an extra zero to it. so i think what is happening, to really cut to the essence of what i'm saying today is that the nature of life is under every bed a radical transformation as the numbers are. all those numbers that we are so familiar with and that period that has been characterized in these oxymoronic terms is actually an entirely new stage of life. 60 is not the new 40. it's
CSPAN
Nov 21, 2012 8:00pm EST
and after all, it's less expensive to live in places like india where the stars in the movie end up gone. i am here today to talk about an alternative to either euthanasia or outsourcing, what soon will be a quarter of the population, and argue that the solution to much ails us as individuals in a society lays in rethinking the map of life, the map of life that was in many ways set up in three score and 10, which seems like a longer lives of the past century but is inadequate to the five score lifespans that more and more people will be living in the 21st century. half the kids born since 2000 the developed world are projected to see their 100th birthday so we can't just fold, spindle, made late stretch and extend this life course that really was set up for a very different arc of life to one that is really, has an extra decibel point, an extra zero to it. so i think what is happening, to really cut to the essence of what i'm saying today is that the nature of life is under every bed a radical transformation as the numbers are. all those numbers that we are so familiar with and that
CSPAN
Nov 22, 2012 12:00pm EST
that moment as getting this visitor from india a seat at the presidential dinner. the greater scheme of things it's a small act but it left a lasting impression on the woman involved. the indian woman involved and on the women in the table that she was eventually seated at. that's how we know about the event. through a letter that someone who she ended up sitting with responded and wrote to pat later about it. for pat politics was her job. one she didn't always enjoy. while on occasion she was proud of the work and helping to raise funds for the party. she found many of the tasks frustrating and mind numbing. by the end of the first term she expressed the friends reentry to the work force. she wrote i would like to do part-time work rather than the useless work i'm expected to do. the thrill of meeting famous men and women and the glamour of white tie dinners wore off leaving only the tiring routine of constant evenings away from the girls, ielgd chatter with women she didn't always like. for someone that worked hard her entire life, she had. the situation could at times be intolerab
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2012 8:00pm EST
nonfiction category, behind a beautiful forevers about a slum in mumbai india and finally anne applebaum has been nominated for iron curtain. that book is just out and she is scheduled to appear under q&a and show in december, so you will be able to see her as well and robert caro will be interviewing those others as we go and we will be watching the red carpet here as some of the authors have their pictures taken that right now we want to talk to the chairman of the national book foundation and this is david steinberger. david steinberger is the head of the perseus book group. if you would, tell us for those who don't know what is the national book award? >> the national book awards are given to the best marketing books in four categories every year so fiction, nonfiction, poetry and literature. it's the pantheon, the greatest american authors, saul bellow, john updike so it's a pretty good big deal to win this award. >> this began 63 years ago? do you know the history when it began or why it began? >> m it was a group of people who are interested in making sure that great looks have the gr
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2012 9:15am EST
. subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago we fought that china and india and other emerging economies might sign on to emissions reductions. and therefore that if we reduce emissions perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. i don't take a position on whether man-made emissions cause global warming or not but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india which make up 37% of the world's population are not doing so we are not going to have any effect on global temperatures and in the first chapter of the book i talk about geo engineering solutions that no prize-winning scientist paul krugman things can reduce global temperatures if we do it on our own such as breaking clouds with salt water or painting room for white to reflect the sun's rays. what we are doing with the $12 billion we're spending on alternative energy is pushing people into cars they don't want to buy, where raising electricity costs, we are getting rid of incandescent light bulbs in favor of fluorescent light bulbs. the cost of this falls disproportionately on those who are least able to
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 8:30am EST
supplier, trading partner with india. the russians answer to the f-35 is the t-50 and the russians are selling the t-50 to india. russia doesn't want to renew the 1990cto, the cooperative threat reduction program, an american financed program. they don't trust america anymore saying america shouldn't tell other countries what their moral values should be when newspaper stories prove we're lacking miranda rule values here in the united states. we have a real big problem going on worldwide, and we just have to completely stop and get into peace negotiations and talk about whose trading partners with who. >> the bills were reform, and none of those directly affect foreign policy because, i believe, that we need to clean house and tend to our own problems before we stick our nose into other people's problems, and the only thick that directly affects the war in syria is that you would have to obey the constitution as originally intended and amended and require congress to declare war on any country where we commit troops. >> getting back to the issue of jobs, f-35, and senator sanders t
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2012 10:00am EST
india and china. it has its own currency, dispute resolution of issues. viewers starting a band, you can get fans through it. you can use facebook and twitter and youtube to topple a government. it is much harder to put down a revolution that is occurring in a thousand places or more over the web than to kill a charismatic leader or bombed headquarters. you can really make some progress by the way it is set out. but if you are a new citizen of facebook, you may not realize what you're getting yourself into. in part it's because they spoke as a term of service shift without warning. so usually it is one lie, but in 2008, they changed it so your friends and relatives can see it as being public. these americans were critics of the iranian government. what happened was these pictures become public. friends and relatives were beat up for something as simple as your friends, which could make a difference. and in so many highs and lows of social networks and twitter and, you know, e-mail. we have seen the arab spring. we have seen the unsettling events around general petraeus and congressma
CSPAN
Nov 6, 2012 6:00am EST
that is in india, because everyone is afraid to stand. i'd just like to point out the great depression went on for more than 10 years after this rooseveltian seamers started but if you count the world war ii as a statement, which even barack obama's economic adviser, christina romer has refuted the idea that the war actually ended the depression, you know, none of that, the actual original failure of keynesian was during the depression and yet nobody saw that way. but if we're going to take that serious, take the idea that taking up slack in demand is what we need to do, how much do we need to spend? what is the dollar figure that government needs to put out? >> are you asking? >> yeah. >> there's a lot of debate about this. it's hard to come with a precise figure because we are human beings and we do the best -- >> the keynesians are the ones who believe that everything is trackable to these complex mathematical formulas with all kinds of greek letters and stuff. [inaudible] >> there was internal debate in the obama administration how big is the gap, how much do you need to
CSPAN
Nov 19, 2012 11:00pm EST
many cases of polio there were in india last year? there was one in 2011, and there's been zero since that time. down to three countries that have polio. this is one of the works of the gate's foundation. bill is going to come and out talk for a few moments on another passion of his which is u.s. education. he'll speak here for a few moments, and we've asked david who is a bureau chief of the "new york times," to come out, join bill up here in the stage and continue with an interview for a few moments. i spoke to david ahead of time asking if he'd do the interview, and david is a pulitzer prize winner, and he asked is there a gate's prize? i said, no, there's not a gate's prize, david, and i hope i didn't take too big a liberty here in asking him to come. i have committed on behalf of the gate's foundation, when there is a prize, david will be the first recipient. [laughter] let me present bill gates. [applause] good afternoon. i want to talk a bit about higher education. the reason i picked that is because i think it's been a huge strength of the united states, very important t
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 7:00am EST
europe, the ottoman empire in what is today turkey, the mogul empire, present-day india, the ching dynasty, temporary china, and the tokugawa shogunate in japan. each of these fears had its own way of governing on its own cultural and political approach to commerce, and order. if you fast-forward about 100, 120 years to the 19th century, the world changed dramatically. power had shifted from the west and the south to the north. and by 1815, the end of the napoleonic wars, europe had pulled ahead of the rest of the world. and the industrial revolution and the development of the steam engine and the development of steel and battleships, and the telegraph and underground, the underwater submarine cable enabled europe, not just to be the most powerful place in the world, but to extend its reach globally. and by the end of the 19th century, europe had either colonized or had already de- colonized 90% of the world landmass. and we have been living in the world since 1815 dominated by the west. economically, politically and ideologically. first it was europe, then europe handed over the b
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 1:20pm EST
example, offered the most successful u.s. special operations in china, burma, india theater. and you can say, special operations started with dos as experience in china during world war ii. and oss also established some of the intelligence from work, the approach to china, for example, the file data system, there training of the young your experts, and those people after rld war to become the leading authorities of maritime intelligence as well as government policy. so those are very big contributions. also some other lessons and some big blunders as well. >> what is one of the blunders? >> well, one of the things is i will say, oss in trying so hard to establish itself as legitimate, tried to prove to others, always constantly trying to prove to others it's worth the importance. in doing so, sometimes the sacrifice of the original mission. for example, its independence om the british intelligence, true reliance upon the british intelligence. the other thing is, oss success of the intelligence
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 6:00am EDT
the big states in asia, like china, india, indonesia. so the challenges are enormous. frankly, the strong leadership from the white house, secretary clinton. we've been able to do a lot, and i think build on some remarkable achievements of the previous administration, including opening to india. i would say so those are the opportunities. ironically for me the biggest challenges are the personal ones. i had a wife was also a senior administration official, and we have young children. and trying to balance figuring out how to be in certain places when you've got pressing either international or domestic kind of family business is remarkably difficult to there's a let down when you're not there for certain things, or the embarrassment when you're diplomatic interlocutor on the phone here's your daughter screaming at the top of her lungs as your trying to negotiate some aspect of an agreement. so i would say, victor, with -- i'm not the one screaming. it's my daughter. [laughter] although it has happened the other way around. so i would say, you know, it's been remarkable as you're go
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2012 8:00pm EST
family? india, and maybe a year they will get 80% of their money back. but what happens during that year? so, i would ctu, please don't get the impression that these people will be made whole. i want to commend my subcommittee chairman, randy neugebauer who is behind me here. i have issued a prepared statement, which i released just a few minutes ago on m. s. -- mf capital. two of them are behind the other than my subcommittee chair. these are superstars in the freshman class. quico canseco from south texas and nan haworth from i guess we will call it the hudson river valley. both of them as freshmen actually pass significant reform legislation. many of you know tranter was valedictorian of her class at princeton. quico's grandparents fled mexico during a revolution, came to america for freedom. he is the american dream. he operated a bank in texas. he has a banking background. they were really loved by republicans and democrats together. nan was actually criticized for being a member of the tea party. believe you me, she may be many things, to leave you me in the campaign she was u
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2012 9:00am EST
to note is all the votes are not india, and i think by the time we report all vote in california, the west coast states that do a lot of absentee voting, the president's marginal grow a bit and i think we'll end up with a margin between obama and romney about 3.5%. so still close but not racist impose a not as close as we might've been talking about for a good deal of the election. i think of something right about all the model going on. i know a lot of people talked about that. i want to give a little shout out to many political scientist. i'm a political scientist. sometimes i'm critical of some of their models, but political models try to predict what happens in elections and they usually have some very simple components. how the president is doing. the growth in the economy. not the state of the economy. not the number of unemployment at how we've been improving over the are, and incumbents usually accounts or something. if you look at this election you can say a little bit of growth matters. a president who was sort of in the middle, 48, 49% job approval rating for much of t
CSPAN
Nov 28, 2012 12:00pm EST
just with rising sea levels. one is diago garcia, a small island south of india, home to a although gist particular hub -- logistic hub. even absent a storm or tsunami, this installation is threatened by intkaeugs for slow -- inundation of slow staepbd did i sea level rise. the norfolk naval base is home to the u.s. atlantic fleet. a "new york times" analysis this past weekend using u.s. geological survey and noaa data showed a five-foot sea level rise would permanently flood portions of that base. the base is at continuing risk from storm surges. by the way, a five-foot sea level rise is now predicted to be a possibility in this century. eglin air force on florida's gulf coast is threatened by storm surge, sea level rise and salt water infiltration. we know -- we know that climate change loads the dice for more and more severe extreme weather. retired brigadier general steven anderson and retired lieutenant general daniel christman used katrina as an example of how extreme weather can cause negative operational impacts to our military. in response to katrina the national guard mobi
CSPAN
Nov 1, 2012 5:00pm EDT
many people agree with. [inaudible] india and the philippines are great experience. in particular around the issue of corruption where sort of large national campaigns of corruption -- [inaudible] and getting censure. having the international stuff for us is excited. because the [inaudible] needed improvement of justice is much greater than we have in the state. do you capture information about the people who sign the e-mails or. >> [inaudible] zip code and able to target people go back environmental petition do you sell or make available -- [inaudible] the same way you might for sam dison. based on interest and take action on based on response rate we personalize recommendation for campaigns. >> can the campaigns buy that from you. no. >> people can pay to sponsor campaigns. they don't get direct send e-mails based on that. it's featured on the site as sponsored beticks like a sponsored tweet might be. >> you'll do the amazon thing. we see you signed four petition here is one that might be interest of you. >> have you discovered a class of people -- [inaudible] what is who is you
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2012 8:00pm EDT
, more than the entire u.s. work force. in five years, india will be producing five times as many college graduates as the united states. these are the facts that drive the decisions we must make as we position penn state to succeed in the future. part of that strategic planning requires getting out and staying out in front of the information technology revolution, which has been among the most significant drivers of educational change in the last 15-20 years. it's also been like a run away train. one response to the higher education funding crisis has been increased appeals, especially from legislatures and business leaders for higher education to drastically increase online education. the hope is that more students receive college degrees faster and at less cost. in fact, research shows, done appropriately, the application of technologies can both improve learning outcomes and decrease the costs of delivering that education. so far, big safings have proven allusive. nonetheless, massive, open online courses are testing the market. dozens of universities including mitt, harvard, princeto
CSPAN
Nov 8, 2012 9:00am EST
happening in india, for example, to try to attract foreign direct investment, to try to attract more entrepreneur, i'm not sure it's still very early in term of the result. i think for the last three decades, the u.s. has had, you know, historically a very healthy immigration pots -- policy, but in the last decade or so, we have gone the other way. when you think about the number of immigrants that come in and build amazing companies, and created jobs, you know, in the hundreds of thousands, we can't be looking at other markets because i don't think there's the perfect model. i think we need to look back at what was happening in the 1970s. in term of the u.s. in the historical model. we did encourage a lot of immigration. a lot of people came in with science, technology, mathematics background. you look at silicon valley, you see the fruit of a lot of that. >> you had a comment? >> i spent seven years of my life painfully as a member of the commission on immigration reform, which was chairmaned by bosch are a jordan in the '90s and i think the way to describe the american immigration
CSPAN
Nov 15, 2012 5:00pm EST
security concerns because of the things going on in libya. >> mccain, graham and india yesterday made remarks about u.n. ambassador susan rice. what did they say in what is it mean in context context of the benghazi attacks? >> well, basically what they said is they don't trust her. they said she should have known better that you say five days after the attack but it looks to be a spontaneous response to anti-muslim video. they said she should have known that it is clear, that there is organized element that looks like a terrorist attack in the she served as fondness for obama's political gain to defend the white house. of course that's not what the white house is saying and today in one of the intelligence briefings we heard from a democrat house staffers they are who said the community reaffirmed that information available at the time. she was repeating the information they provided her. >> intelligence committees he mentioned closed-door meetings and not hear from david trias just resigned direct her. what do they want to know from former petraeus? >> are you currently we will
CSPAN
Nov 23, 2012 11:30pm EST
india a seat at the presidential dinner. this is really a small act, but it left a lasting impression on the indian woman involved and on the women at the table that she was eventually ceded back. how we know about this is through a letter with some and she ended up sitting wet and wrote later about. on occasion she was proud of the work she found many other tasks frustrating and mindnumbing. by the end of the first term, she expressed her jealousy of her friends reentry into the workforce. she wrote that i would like to do part-time work rather than all the useless gabbing about that i am expected to do. the thrill of meeting famous men and women in the grammar of white tie dinners at the white house were off. leaving idle chatter with women that she did not always lie. she was someone who worked hard her entire life and should have done so. the situation could at times be intolerable. it was not the physical challenges await her down. she resented not being the useful in doing something meaningful. perhaps that is why foreign travel appeals to her. during her trips overse
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2012 7:15am EST
something else. what was going in india at that time was not an islamic buddy in the. one important aspect of that was to raise the issue of authenticity. what was an authentic indian, anti-odds was only the hand experience of india was authentically indian. and what that meant was all the minorities was the largest minority among the minority. were in some way an authentic. i found that very annoying. and so i thought i would take a very small minority, which is a south indian jewish community. and then create an even smaller minority by having somebody from that community mary into a south indian catholic family, thus creating a catholic-a jewish individuals probably a minority of one person in a country of a billion people. and then show that you could actually grow the whole experience of india out of that one person. you know, so that everybody in indian is authentically indian. that's what it wanted to say. and not just any particular devotional group. [applause] >> i mean, the novel came out of that desire to rescue what it was to an indian from the logic of this kind of atta
CSPAN
Nov 16, 2012 7:00pm EST
, but policy is in india's government is willing to do. so reconciliation and reparation is not only about financial. it's part of the solution in my view. >> thank you. right here in front. >> thank you. my newest entry network at network at the washington institute. people think of al qaeda as a terrorist organization, increasingly as the insurgency in yemen and many of the lessons learned might be some things and i'm struck by how much the policies discussed is eerily similar to attacks in iraq and afghanistan -- [inaudible] >> thank you. greg, do it to start up one? >> sure, i'll try to i'll try to be brief, which is against my nature, but i'll try so we can give our questions then. like i said earlier, it is important for us to think of al qaeda more like they think of themselves as an organization. we saw in 20112012 as ibrahim mentioned that al qaeda was able to provide services to the essentially became the defect or governing body. they set up their own police system, the court system and were providing water, electricity. and they were providing importantly security. it was
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2012 4:30pm EST
egypt, india, algeria and africa clearly did not fit the presidency of educated elites and by their definition close to life unworthy of life, unquote. but these transfer marinade for a decade. in the meantime, american prosperity continues spreading to the rest of the civilized world. american advertisers come the film in the literature became highly desired in europe. it's another irony at this time. american movie saudi production emphasizes universal american team, sexualization, other top devices. american movie sold american exceptionalism, including puritanical moralist and as one observer put it. they occasionally need people such as keaton and charlie chaplin. is it is all done tongue-in-cheek to undermine the system itself. in 1832 u.s. at 18,000 movie houses and compared to francis, 2400 britain's 3000. europe simply could not compete with hollywood and american exceptionalism from the europeans want to be like mike. inflation, communist, agitation, ethnic unrest in the slow contradictions of versailles and cause the postwar european structure to crumble into the totalita
CSPAN
Nov 13, 2012 8:00pm EST
territory, in the he's, china, india, and about the only things that the rest of the world likes about america are movie, tv, science, and technology. they are not keen on the democracy, as least as america preaches it. heading now into another four years of the obama administration where are we, and why are we here, and how do we get somewhere else? how do we live up to that promise? what went wrong? what's going right? what can we do about it going forward? >> simple. [laughter] well, fist of all, i don't think that favorability ratinging in the surveys are evidence of whether we are doing something wrong or right, and it's a huge mistake for anybody who practices public diplomacy to think that his or her job is to win a popularity contest. while i guess maybe some of us in the bush administration can take a certain pleasure at the fact that in 2008 the favorability ratings for the united states were higher and four out of the five surveyed arab countries, i'm not going to bring that up. [laughter] no, but i think it -- i think it's a big mistake, and, you know, in my view, and what
CSPAN
Nov 20, 2012 6:00am EST
of 10 to 15 years, the strategic interests of countries like china and india in the middle east will increase and the role they will attempt to play is bound to increase because their supplies still become imported from at the same time, given the importance of the islamic world and what will accumulate in the region, continues to add interest in stability the new security team will have to do to make nontraditional assessment of heart they imagine the evolution -- and some of this will depend on the outcome of the election over the period of 10 to 15 years iran emerges as a country conducting normal publicity and will continue to be a country influenced with theological evolution. but that will be -- i expect china and india will become more active players in the region >> i will take the brunt of and ask one last question. we were talking earlier outside about a new country on the american foreign policy agenda, me and mar burma. president obama is going there. something is happening. is it important? how does it matter? >> burma is a country with a large population of potential re
CSPAN
Nov 9, 2012 11:00pm EST
pakistan's relationship to india, the sequence of events that take place after 2014 when the americans focus, again, as steve mentioned, when the american focus becomes somewhat less on the relationship through counterterrorism and opens the door for more creative ways of business, academic, media, other links with pakistan that really suffered in the last ten years because of the focus on ct. i guess i come out to the question answering that i'm cautiously optimistic if we keep it on the rails, which if you know what happened over two years, it's not an easy thing, but like rolling down the side of a are vein, and you don't know how far the ravine goes. when i say "keeping things on track," it's not easy to keep things on track in pakistan because of the way it's mismanaged, because of the difficulties in the relationship, but if we are able to do so, i think after 2014, there will be a prospect to open up to new kinds of cooperation if we are not slaves to a bilateral vision that's based on this trust, but if we focus on the multilateral and regional issues leading to economic growth
CSPAN
Nov 5, 2012 11:00pm EST
and no one to fill them. then people complain when we have to find employees from places like india and abroad, and they complain that these companies send the problems. king: this is a problem. i sat down with the chamber of commerce and say ted we have 500 empty jobs in your county we can't fill because the people don't have the skills. high-tech manufacturing jobs. there's a disconnect between the educational system and the jobmark, and i think -- for example, just in terms of how complexity is, there's something like 55 different federal job training programs administered by nine different agencies. that's a recipe for both too much money, too much cost, and not enough coordination. so i think what we need to do is to have a closer link -- what told the folks, i'd like if i'm fortunate enough to be elected to put together a skills summit. not a job summit but a skills schmidt, so bring together the community colleges, technical schools, high schools, and university, with businesses to talk about what is actually needed so we can provide our people with the skills. to me it's hea
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